RECTANGLES MAY APPEAR TO REVERSE LIKE TRAPEZIA WHEN THEY ROTATE AT AN UNEVEN RATE

Roddy Cowie, R. Mitchell, K. Mcmullen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 1983-1985 theory by Mitchell and Power predicts that, when rotating rectangles undergo certain kinds of speed fluctuation, they should appear to reverse just as trapezia do. The prediction is partially confirmed. One of two 'mimic' rectangles underwent apparent reversals more often than a control rectangle undergoing even rotation and in the same places as rotating trapezia. However, its reversal frequency was less than those of the trapezia, and a second 'mimic' showed an inappropriate distribution of reversals round the cycle. These anomalies call for some modification to Mitchell and Power's theory, but minor qualifications may be sufficient.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)643-648
Number of pages6
JournalPERCEPTUAL AND MOTOR SKILLS
Volume74
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Cite this

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title = "RECTANGLES MAY APPEAR TO REVERSE LIKE TRAPEZIA WHEN THEY ROTATE AT AN UNEVEN RATE",
abstract = "A 1983-1985 theory by Mitchell and Power predicts that, when rotating rectangles undergo certain kinds of speed fluctuation, they should appear to reverse just as trapezia do. The prediction is partially confirmed. One of two 'mimic' rectangles underwent apparent reversals more often than a control rectangle undergoing even rotation and in the same places as rotating trapezia. However, its reversal frequency was less than those of the trapezia, and a second 'mimic' showed an inappropriate distribution of reversals round the cycle. These anomalies call for some modification to Mitchell and Power's theory, but minor qualifications may be sufficient.",
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journal = "PERCEPTUAL AND MOTOR SKILLS",
issn = "0031-5125",
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RECTANGLES MAY APPEAR TO REVERSE LIKE TRAPEZIA WHEN THEY ROTATE AT AN UNEVEN RATE. / Cowie, Roddy; Mitchell, R.; Mcmullen, K.

In: PERCEPTUAL AND MOTOR SKILLS, Vol. 74, 1992, p. 643-648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - RECTANGLES MAY APPEAR TO REVERSE LIKE TRAPEZIA WHEN THEY ROTATE AT AN UNEVEN RATE

AU - Cowie, Roddy

AU - Mitchell, R.

AU - Mcmullen, K.

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - A 1983-1985 theory by Mitchell and Power predicts that, when rotating rectangles undergo certain kinds of speed fluctuation, they should appear to reverse just as trapezia do. The prediction is partially confirmed. One of two 'mimic' rectangles underwent apparent reversals more often than a control rectangle undergoing even rotation and in the same places as rotating trapezia. However, its reversal frequency was less than those of the trapezia, and a second 'mimic' showed an inappropriate distribution of reversals round the cycle. These anomalies call for some modification to Mitchell and Power's theory, but minor qualifications may be sufficient.

AB - A 1983-1985 theory by Mitchell and Power predicts that, when rotating rectangles undergo certain kinds of speed fluctuation, they should appear to reverse just as trapezia do. The prediction is partially confirmed. One of two 'mimic' rectangles underwent apparent reversals more often than a control rectangle undergoing even rotation and in the same places as rotating trapezia. However, its reversal frequency was less than those of the trapezia, and a second 'mimic' showed an inappropriate distribution of reversals round the cycle. These anomalies call for some modification to Mitchell and Power's theory, but minor qualifications may be sufficient.

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 643

EP - 648

JO - PERCEPTUAL AND MOTOR SKILLS

JF - PERCEPTUAL AND MOTOR SKILLS

SN - 0031-5125

ER -