Review of industrial temperature measurement technologies and research priorities for the thermal characterisation of the factories of the future

David Ross-Pinnock*, Paul G. Maropoulos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the largest source of dimensional measurement uncertainty, addressing the challenges of thermal variation is vital to ensure product and equipment integrity in the factories of the future. While it is possible to closely control room temperature, this is often not practical or economical to realise in all cases where inspection is required. This article reviews recent progress and trends in seven key commercially available industrial temperature measurement sensor technologies primarily in the range of 0 °C-50 °C for invasive, semi-invasive and non-invasive measurement. These sensors will ultimately be used to measure and model thermal variation in the assembly, test and integration environment. The intended applications for these technologies are presented alongside some consideration of measurement uncertainty requirements with regard to the thermal expansion of common materials. Research priorities are identified and discussed for each of the technologies as well as temperature measurement at large. Future developments are briefly discussed to provide some insight into which direction the development and application of temperature measurement technologies are likely to head.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)793-806
Number of pages14
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture
Volume230
Issue number5
Early online date06 Feb 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 May 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the EPSRC, grant EP/K018124/1, 'The Light Controlled Factory'.

Publisher Copyright:
© IMechE 2015.

Keywords

  • Dimensional metrology
  • Factories of the future
  • Light Controlled Factory
  • Temperature measurement
  • Thermal variation modelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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