Review of non-intrusive load monitoring methods in distribution networks to optimise renewable energy integration

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics, battery storage, small-scale wind turbines and electric vehicles create technical challenges in distribution networks by changing the behaviour of the network from passive to active. Understanding the properties of the DER in the network, including their electrical connection location, is vital to enable effective distribution system operation. Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) is a key research area for identifying DER locations. This paper first compares load modelling and event detection in distribution and transmission systems. Second, a review of different state-of-the-art NILM methodologies currently used in industrial and residential sectors is presented. Then, a discussion is provided of proposed NILM methodologies at the distribution level in light of the challenges and opportunities to support effective decision making. Although extensive research has been carried out on load identification, the lack of NILM methods based on time-synchronised measurements focused on the distribution system provides a new research area to contribute to DER integration.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019
Event14th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES) - Dubrovnik, Croatia
Duration: 01 Oct 201906 Oct 2019
https://www.dubrovnik2019.sdewes.org/

Conference

Conference14th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES)
Abbreviated titleSDEWES2019
CountryCroatia
CityDubrovnik
Period01/10/201906/10/2019
Internet address

Keywords

  • Distributed energy resources
  • Non-intrusive load monitoring
  • transient state
  • steady state
  • distribution grid
  • electrical signature

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