Role of central dopaminergic pathways in the neural control of growth hormone secretion in normal men: Studies with metoclopramide

V. Arce, L. Lima, N. Lois, A. Rodriguez, M.J. Diaz, J.A.F. Tresguerres, J. Devesa

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the role that central dopaminergic pathways play in GH neuroregulation in man. Our experimental hypothesis was based on the possibility that most of the controversies on DA role could be due to the fact that the hypothalamic somatotroph rhythm (HSR) was not taken into account when interpreting the GH responses after pharmacological manipulations on dopaminergic pathways. In 10 normal subjects we monitored the effect of central dopaminergic blockade, achieved with metoclopramide (MCP; 10 mg, i.v. Bolus), on the pattern of spontaneous GH secretion and the GH responses to a GHRH challenge (GRF , 1 µg/kg, i.v. bolus) administered together with MCP or 60 min after this drug was given. The study of HSR was made according to our previous postulate. Our results indicate that MCP administration, either prior to or together with the GHRH bolus, significantly increased GHRH-induced GH release during a refractory HSR phase; but not when the GHRH challenge took place during a spotaneous secretory phase. The strong relationship between pre-GHRH plasma GH values and GHRH-elicited GH peaks was lost when MCP was given. These data indicate that MCP was able to disrupt the intrinsic HSR by inhibiting the hypothalamic release of somatostain (SS). While a main conclusion would be that central DA is a secretagogue for SS secretion, our results also suggest that this role could be dependent on its effects on the adrenergic inputs to SS neurons.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroendocrinology
Volume53
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 1991

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