Scaling laws for Proton acceleration from the rear surface of laser-irradiated thin foils

J. Fuchs*, P. Antici, E. D'Humières, E. Lefebvre, M. Borghesi, E. Brambrink, C. A. Cecchetti, M. Kaluza, V. Malka, M. Manclossi, S. Meyroneinc, P. Mora, J. Schreiber, T. Toncian, H. Pépin, P. Audebert

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on the topic of laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications. Ultra-bright beams of multi-MeV protons are produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense short laser pulses. These sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications, in particular proton therapy of deep-seated tumours. Here we show that scaling laws deduced from fluid models reproduce well the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. These scaling laws show that, in our regime, there is an optimum in the laser pulse duration of ∼200 fs-1 ps, with a needed laser energy level of 30 to 100 J, in order to achieve e.g. 200 MeV energy protons necessary for proton therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSUPERSTRONG FIELDS IN PLASMAS
Subtitle of host publication3rd International Conference on Superstrong Fields in Plasmas
Pages237-247
Number of pages11
Volume827
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07 Apr 2006
Event3rd International Conference on Superstrong Fields in Plasmas - Varenna, Italy
Duration: 19 Sep 200524 Sep 2005

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Superstrong Fields in Plasmas
CountryItaly
CityVarenna
Period19/09/200524/09/2005

Keywords

  • High-energy particles
  • Laser accelerators
  • Ultra-intense lasers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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