Security governance in transition: The compartmentalising, crowding out and corralling of policing and security in Northern Ireland

Graham Ellison, Mary O'Rawe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article suggests that while the report of the Independent Commission on Policing (ICP) provides a police reform blueprint for Northern Ireland and elsewhere, it can also be seen as an attempt to engage more elliptically with contemporary debates in security governance vis-a-vis the increasingly fragmented nature of late-modern policing and the role of the state. A decade into the reform process in Northern Ireland and in spite of the networked approach postulated by the ICP, the public police continue to enjoy a pre-eminent place and little evidence exists of any significant weakening of state steering and rowing of security. The discussion proposes a tentative typology explaining the continued colonization of security spaces by the State using constituent attendant processes of compartmentalizing, crowding out and corralling.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-57
Number of pages27
JournalTheoretical Criminology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Security governance in transition: The compartmentalising, crowding out and corralling of policing and security in Northern Ireland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this