Seroepidemiological survey for canine angiostrongylosis in dogs from Germany and the UK using combined detection of Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and specific antibodies

M. Schnyder*, R. Schaper, G. Bilbrough, E. R. Morgan, P. Deplazes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dogs infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum, a potentially lethal parasite parasitizing the heart and pulmonary arteries, may present severe respiratory, haematological and neurological signs. In this first large-scale seroepidemiological survey, 4003 sera originating from Germany and 4030 from the UK were tested by an ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen of A. vasorum, and by a separate ELISA detecting specific antibodies. In Germany, where mainly western federal states were sampled, 0·3% (n = 13, CI: 0·2-0·6%) of dogs were positive in both ELISAs, whereas in total 0·5% (n = 20, CI: 0·3-0·8%) were antigen-positive and 2·25% (n = 90, CI: 1·8-2·8%) were positive for specific antibodies. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals were overlapping. In the UK, where mainly the south of the country was sampled, 0·97% (n = 39, CI: 0·7-1·3%) of dogs were antigen- and antibody positive. In total, 1·32% (n = 53, CI: 1·0-1·7%) were antigen-positive, and 3·2% (n = 129, CI: 2·7-3·8%) were positive for specific antibodies, again in overlapping regions. These results confirm the occurrence of A. vasorum in a random dog population originating from large parts of the countries investigated. The use of the tests alone or in combination was considered as a function of their sensitivities and specificities, in order to guide efficient clinical and epidemiological application.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1442-1450
Number of pages9
JournalParasitology
Volume140
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Angiostrongylus vasorum
  • antibody detection
  • antigen detection
  • dog
  • Germany
  • serological survey
  • UK

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Infectious Diseases

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