Significance of tagI and mfd genes in the virulence of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

Denis A. Spricigo, Pilar Cortes, David Moranta, Jordi Barbe, Jose Antonio Bengoechea, Montserrat Llagostera*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunist pathogen well adapted to the human upper respiratory tract and responsible for many respiratory diseases. In the human airway, NTHi is exposed to pollutants, such as alkylating agents, that damage its DNA. In this study, we examined the significance of genes involved in the repair of DNA alkylation damage in NTHi virulence. Two knockout mutants, tagI and mfd, encoding N(3)methyladenine-DNA glycosylase I and the key protein involved in transcription-coupled repair, respectively, were constructed and their virulence in a BALB/c mice model was examined. This work shows that N-3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase I is constitutively expressed in NTHi and that it is relevant for its virulence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Microbiology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Haemophilus influenzae
  • alkylating agents
  • virulence
  • genes tagI and mfd
  • DNA GLYCOSYLASE-I
  • ESCHERICHIA-COLI
  • ALKYLATING-AGENTS
  • REPAIR
  • DAMAGE

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