Souvenaid in the management of mild cognitive impairment: An expert consensus opinion

Jeffrey Cummings*, Peter Passmore, Bernadette McGuinness, Vincent Mok, Christopher Chen, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Michael Woodward, Sagrario Manzano, Guillermo Garcia-Ribas, Stefano Cappa, Paulo Bertolucci, Leung Wing Chu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)
220 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among an aging global population is a growing challenge for healthcare providers and payers. In many cases, MCI is an ominous portent for dementia. Early and accurate diagnosis of MCI provides a window of opportunity to improve the outcomes using a personalized care plan including lifestyle modifications to reduce the impact of modifiable risk factors (for example, blood pressure control and increased physical activity), cognitive training, dietary advice, and nutritional support. Souvenaid is a once-daily drink containing a mixture of precursors and cofactors (long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, uridine, choline, B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium), which was developed to support the formation and function of neuronal membranes and synapses. Healthcare providers, patients, and carers require expert advice about the use of Souvenaid. Methods: An international panel of experts was convened to review the evidence and to make recommendations about the diagnosis and management of MCI, identification of candidates for Souvenaid, and use of Souvenaid in real-world practice. This article provides a summary of the expert opinions and makes recommendations for clinical practice and future research. Summary of opinion: Early diagnosis of MCI requires the use of suitable neuropsychological tests combined with a careful clinical history. A multimodal approach is recommended; dietary and nutritional interventions should be considered alongside individualized lifestyle modifications. Although single-agent nutritional supplements have failed to produce cognitive benefits for patients with MCI, a broader nutritional approach warrants consideration. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that Souvenaid should be considered as an option for some patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD), including those with MCI due to AD (prodromal AD). Conclusion: Early and accurate diagnosis of MCI provides a window of opportunity to improve the outcomes using a multimodal management approach including lifestyle risk factor modification and consideration of the multinutrient Souvenaid.

Original languageEnglish
Article number73
JournalAlzheimer's Research and Therapy
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Diet
  • Memory
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Nutrient
  • Prodromal Alzheimer's disease
  • Souvenaid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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