Stability, fatty acid composition and sensory properties of the M. Longissimus muscle from beef steers grazing either chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass

C. L. Marley, R. Fychan, J. W. Davies, V. J. Theobald, N. D. Scollan, R. I. Richardson, R. Sanderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
187 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Research has shown both production and health benefits for the use of chicory (Cichorium intybus) within ruminant diets. Despite this, little was known about the effects of this forage, containing differing fatty acid profiles and secondary plant compounds compared with ryegrass, on beef stability, fatty acid composition or sensory properties. An experiment was conducted to investigate whether the inclusion of chicory in the diet of grazing beef steers would alter these three properties in the M. Longissimus muscle when compared with beef steers grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Triplicate 2 ha plots were established with a chicory (cv. Puna II)/perennial ryegrass mix or a perennial ryegrass control. A core group of 36 Belgian Blue - cross steers were used within a 2-year beef finishing experiment (n=6/replicate plot). In the 2nd grazing year, steers were slaughtered as they reached a target fat class of 3. Muscle pH was checked 2 and 48 h post-slaughter. A section of the hindloin joint containing the M. Longissimus lumborum muscle was removed and a 20 mm-thick steak was cut and muscle samples were taken for analysis of vitamin E and fatty acid analysis. The remaining section of the loin was vacuum packed in modified atmosphere packs and subjected to simulated retail display. A section of the conditioned loin was used for sensory analysis. Data on pH, vitamin E concentration and colour stability in a simulated retail display showed there were no effects of including chicory in the diet of grazing beef steers on meat stability. There were also no differences found in the fatty acid composition or the overall eating quality of the steaks from the two treatments. In conclusion, there were no substantive effects of including chicory in the swards of grazing beef cattle on meat stability, fatty acid composition or sensory properties of the M. Longissimus muscle when compared with beef steers grazing ryegrass-only swards.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)882-888
JournalAnimal
Volume12
Issue number4
Early online date07 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • cattle
  • Cichorium intybus
  • forage
  • lipid
  • meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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