Staffing, status and subject knowledge: what does the construction of citizenship as a new curriculum subject in England tell us about the nature of school subjects?

Jeremy Hayward, Lee Jerome

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Almost a decade ago, the new subject of citizenship was created in the English National Curriculum and several universities were funded to train teachers in this new subject. This presented a rare challenge, namely how to train people to teach a subject that did not exist in schools, and in which they were unlikely to have a specialist degree. In this article we have taken the opportunity afforded by the
    tenth birthday of the report in which Crick recommended this curriculum reform to reflect on that experience from the perspective of teacher educators. Through reflecting on the case study of citizenship education in England we highlight several themes that are of more general interest to teacher educators. The key issues that have emerged in this case study relate to the general problems of translating central policy into classroom practice; the nature and aims of subjects in the curriculum; and the identities of teachers in secondary schools. The article illustrates how teacher educators responded to the formidable challenge of creating (or at least contributing to) a new subject and a subject community.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)211-225
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Education for Teaching
    Volume36
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2010

    Keywords

    • curriculum
    • school subject
    • citizenship
    • curriculum reform

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Staffing, status and subject knowledge: what does the construction of citizenship as a new curriculum subject in England tell us about the nature of school subjects?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this