Stress resistance and disease resistance in seaweeds: The role of reactive oxygen metabolism

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Abstract

It has become clear over the last 15-20 years that the immediate effect of a wide range of environmental stresses, and of infection, on vascular plants is to increase the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to impose oxidative stress on the cells. Since 1994, sufficient examples of similar responses in a broad range of marine macroalgae have been described to show that reactive oxygen metabolism also underlies the mechanisms by which seaweeds respond (and become resistant) to stress and infection. Desiccation, freezing, low temperatures, high light, ultraviolet radiation, and heavy metals all tend to result in a gradual and continued buildup of ROS because photosynthesis is inhibited and excess energy results in the formation of singlet oxygen. The response to other stresses (infection or oligosaccharides which signal that infection is occurring, mechanical stress, hyperosmotic shock) is quite different-a more rapid and intense, but short-lived production of ROS, described as an
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-207
Number of pages33
JournalADVANCES IN BOTANICAL RESEARCH, VOL 43
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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