Study of an Educational Hand Sorting Intervention for Reducing Aflatoxin B1 in Groundnuts in Rural Gambia

Ya Xu, Andrew Doel, Sinead Watson, Michael N. Routledge, Christopher T. Elliott, Sophie E. Moore, Yun Yun Gong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
314 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aflatoxin, a human liver carcinogen, frequently contaminates groundnuts, maize, rice, and other grains, especially in Africa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention that involved training rural Gambian women on how to identify and remove moldy groundnuts to reduce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination. In total, 25 women, recruited from the West Kiang region of The Gambia, were trained on how to recognize and remove moldy groundnuts. Market-purchased groundnuts were hand sorted by the women. Groundnuts were sampled at baseline (n =5), after hand sorting (“clean,” n =25 and “moldy,” n =25), and after roasting (n =5). All samples were analyzed for AFB1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A reduction of 42.9% was achieved based on the median AFB1 levels at baseline and after hand sorting (clean groundnuts), whereas an alternative estimate, based on the total AFB1 in moldy and clean groundnuts, indicated a reduction of 96.7%, with a loss of only 2% of the groundnuts. By roasting the already clean sorted groundnuts, the AFB1 reduction achieved (based on median levels) was 39.3%. This educational intervention on how to identify and remove moldy groundnuts was simple and effective in reducing AFB1 contamination.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume80
Issue number1
Early online date21 Dec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

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