Studying and learning psychology during the Covid-19 pandemic: a mixed-methods approach on students’ perspectives of psychological wellbeing and adjustment to studying online

Elida Cena*, Paul Toner, Aideen McParland, Stephanie Burns, Katrin Dudgeon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
48 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The challenges presented by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in higher education pressured learners and instructors to incorporate online emergent learning which presented several well-being and academic challenges to students. Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of studying online to students’ well-being. Methods: A mixed methods approach was followed for this study. Eighty students completed an online survey that measured their stress level of studying online, and 13 semistructured interviews were conducted at Queen's University Belfast. Results: Findings suggest that online learning under such circumstances increased students’ level of stress due to a number of perceived factors. Our findings also reveal the journey of student adjustment to online learning, reflecting the flexibility of blended learning as a long-term pedagogical strategy in universities, necessary for University's survival. Conclusion: As demonstrated in this study, after the initial difficulties of moving to online learning which had negative impacts on students learning and well-being, students subsequently adjusted to the online learning environment documenting students’ adaptability to a new learning environment and highlighting student resilience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-158
Number of pages22
JournalPsychology Learning and Teaching
Volume22
Issue number2
Early online date27 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • Online learning, COVID-19, student wellbeing, blended learning
  • Education
  • General Psychology

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