Studying Positive and Negative Direct and Extended Contact: Complementing Self-Reports With Social Network Analysis

Ralph Wölfer, Eva Jaspers, Danielle Blaylock, Clarissa Wigoder, Joanne Hughes, Miles Hewstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)
335 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Traditionally, studies of intergroup contact have primarily relied on self-reports, which is a valid method for studying intergroup contact, but has limitations especially if researchers are interested in negative or extended contact. In three studies, we apply social network analysis to generate alternative contact parameters. Studies 1 and 2 examine self-reported and network-based parameters of positive and negative contact using cross-sectional datasets (N = 291; N = 258), indicating that both methods help to explain intergroup relations. Study 3 examines positive and negative direct and extended contact using the previously validated network-based contact parameters within a large-scale, international, and longitudinal dataset (N = 12,988), demonstrating that positive and negative direct and extended contact all uniquely predict intergroup relations (i.e., intergroup attitudes and future outgroup contact). Findings highlight the value of social network analysis for examining the full complexity of contact including positive and negative forms of direct and extended contact.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1566-1581
Number of pages16
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume43
Issue number11
Early online date24 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • extended contact
  • intergroup contact
  • negative contact
  • social network analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Studying Positive and Negative Direct and Extended Contact: Complementing Self-Reports With Social Network Analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this