Sugar Coating: Utilisation of Host Serum Sialoglycoproteins by Schistosoma mansoni as a Potential Immune Evasion Mechanism.

Maude Dagenais, Jared Q Gerlach, Timothy G. Geary, Thavy Long

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Abstract

Parasitic helminths resort to various mechanisms to evade and modulate their host's immune response, several of which have been described for Schistosoma mansoni. We recently reported the presence of sialic acid residues on the surface of adult S. mansoni extracellular vesicles (EVs). We now report that these sialylated molecules are mammalian serum proteins. In addition, our data suggest that most sialylated EV-associated proteins do not elicit a humoral response upon injection into mice, or in sera obtained from infected animals. Sialic acids frequently terminate glycans on the surface of vertebrate cells, where they serve important functions in physiological processes such as cell adhesion and signalling. Interestingly, several pathogens have evolved ways to mimic or utilise host sialic acid beneficially by coating their own proteins, thereby facilitating cell invasion and providing protection from host immune effectors. Together, our results indicate that S. mansoni EVs are coated with host glycoproteins, which may contribute to immune evasion by masking antigenic sites, protecting EVs from removal from serum and aiding in cell adhesion and entry to exert their functions.
Original languageEnglish
Article number426
JournalPathogens
Volume11
Issue number4
Early online date31 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Apr 2022

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