Systematic review and meta-analyses of incidence for group B streptococcus disease in infants and antimicrobial resistance, China

Yijun Ding, Yajuan Wang*, Yingfen Hsia, Neal Russell, Paul T. Heath

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the incidence, case-fatality rate (CFR), isolate antimicrobial resistance patterns, and serotype and sequence type distributions for invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in infants <1–89 days of age in China. We searched the PubMed/Medline, Embase, Wanfang, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases for research published during January 1, 2000–March 16, 2018, and identified 64 studies. Quality of included studies was assessed by using Cochrane tools. Incidence and CFR were estimated by using random-effects meta-analyses. Overall incidence was 0.55 (95% CI 0.35–0.74) cases/1,000 live births, and the CFR was 5% (95% CI 3%–6%). Incidence of GBS in young infants in China was higher than the estimated global incidence (0.49 cases/1,000 live births) and higher than previous estimates for Asia (0.3 cases/1,000 live births). Our findings suggest that implementation of additional GBS prevention efforts in China, including maternal vaccination, could be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2651-2659
Number of pages9
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Beijing Hospitals Authority Youth Programme (grant no. QML 20181207).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All rights reserved.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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