Tackling brain and muscle dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome survivors: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Report

Jessica A Palakshappa, Jane A E Batt, Sue C Bodine, Bronwen A Connolly, Jason Doles, Jason R Falvey, Lauren E Ferrante, D Clark Files, Michael O Harhay, Kirsten Harrell, Joseph A Hippensteel, Theodore J Iwashyna, James C Jackson, Meghan B Lane-Fall, Michelle Monje, Marc Moss, Dale M Needham, Matthew W Semler, Shouri Lahiri, Lars LarssonCarla M Sevin, Tarek Sharshar, Benjamin Singer, Troy Stevens, Stephanie P Taylor, Christian R Gomez, Guofei Zhou, Timothy D Girard, Catherine L Hough

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Abstract

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with long-term impairments in brain and muscle function that significantly impact the quality of life of those who survive the acute illness. The mechanisms underlying these impairments are not yet well understood, and evidence-based interventions to minimize the burden on patients remain unproven. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health assembled a workshop in April 2023 to review the state of the science regarding ARDS-associated brain and muscle dysfunction, to identify gaps in current knowledge, and to determine priorities for future investigation. The workshop included presentations by scientific leaders across the translational science spectrum and was open to the public as well as the scientific community. This report describes the themes discussed at the workshop as well as recommendations to advance the field toward the goal of improving the health and wellbeing of ARDS survivors.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Early online date12 Mar 2024
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 12 Mar 2024

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