Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of Peer Learning in their Classrooms: Using Social Interdependence Theory as a Model for Data Analysis and Presentation

Maria Cockerill*, Nicole Craig, Allen Thurston

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
353 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Peer tutoring is a structured process of co-operative learning, supported by social interdependence theory shown to have cognitive and affective level benefits. During a RCT, this study explores teacher perceptions (n=62) of effects of co-operative learning, including implementation issues, using a mixed methods approach during a 16-week peer tutoring intervention in 58 classes (10 secondary/high schools) in England. Data suggested strengthened peer relationships enhanced student learning. Teacher perceptions remained consistent and are congruent with social interdependence theory and research validating the theory. Implications for research, theory, practice and policy are discussed. Research was supported by Educational Endowment Foundation grant: Spring2012-105.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-27
Number of pages14
JournalInternation Journal of Education and Practice
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • peer-tutoring Co-operative learning Social interdependence theory Teacher co-production in RCT design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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