Teaching citizenship in the faith school: qualitative evidence from separate schools in Northern Ireland

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine how teachers teach and students learn about citizenship education in two faith-based schools in Northern Ireland. The data show that participants in the Catholic school were confident in their own identity; teachers encouraged active engagement with contentious, conflict-related debates and students displayed empathy with other racial and religious groups. In the Protestant school, teachers avoided any reference to identity and conflict and students seemed to have limited knowledge of these issues. The findings emphasise the extent to which separate schools embody the cultural norms prevalent within each of the communities that they serve and reveal the influence which these norms have for teaching and learning about citizenship.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalIrish Educational Studies
Early online date11 Aug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 11 Aug 2017

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faith
citizenship
Teaching
school
evidence
teacher
religious group
student
empathy
learning
community
education

Keywords

  • separate school, citizenship education, identity, Northern Ireland, intergroup contact

Cite this

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title = "Teaching citizenship in the faith school: qualitative evidence from separate schools in Northern Ireland",
abstract = "The purpose of this paper is to examine how teachers teach and students learn about citizenship education in two faith-based schools in Northern Ireland. The data show that participants in the Catholic school were confident in their own identity; teachers encouraged active engagement with contentious, conflict-related debates and students displayed empathy with other racial and religious groups. In the Protestant school, teachers avoided any reference to identity and conflict and students seemed to have limited knowledge of these issues. The findings emphasise the extent to which separate schools embody the cultural norms prevalent within each of the communities that they serve and reveal the influence which these norms have for teaching and learning about citizenship.",
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