Temporal distribution of porcine circovirus 2 genogroups recovered from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome-affected and -nonaffected farms in Ireland and Northern Ireland

Gordon Allan, F. McNeilly, M. McMenamy, I. McNair, S.G. Krakowka, S. Timmusk, D. Walls, Michael Donnelly, D. Minahin, J. Ellis, P. Wallgren, C. Fossum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now recognized as the essential infectious component of porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). PMWS was first recognized in high-status, specific pathogen-free pigs in Canada in 1991 and is now an economically important disease that affects the swine industry around the world. Recently, reports of genomic studies on PCV2 viruses indicated that 2 distinctive genogroups of PCV2 exist.(4,10) This report involves the results of a study on the distribution of predominant PCV2 genogroups recovered from samples taken from PMWS-affected and PMWS-nonaffected farms on the island of Ireland over a 9-year period and the results of a study on PCV2 genogroup recovery from fecal samples taken from a farm in Northern Ireland from 2003 to 2005 that was first diagnosed as PMWS positive in August 2005. The results indicate that, although at least 2 distinct genogroups of PCV2 have been circulating on pig farms on the island of Ireland, there does not appear to be a direct relationship between infection with these different genogroups of PCV2 and the development of PMWS.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)668-673
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc
Volume19
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

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