The effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation on immune function in healthy volunteers

A. P. Nugent, H. M. Roche*, E. J. Noone, A. Long, D. K. Kelleher, M. J. Gibney

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the effects of dietary supplementation using two isomeric blends of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on immune function in healthy human volunteers. Design: Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled intervention trial. Subjects and intervention: A total of 55 healthy volunteers (n = 20 males, n = 35 females) were randomised into one of three study groups who received 3 g/day of a fatty acid blend containing a 50:50 cis-9, trans-11: trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer blend (2 g CLA), and 80:20 cis-9, trans-11: trans-10, cis-12 (80:20) CLA isomer blend (1.76 g CLA) or linoleic acid (control, 2 g linoleic acid) for 8 weeks. Results: Supplementation with the 80:20 CLA isomer blend significantly (P≤0.05) enhanced PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation. CLA decreased basal interleukin (IL)-2 secretion (P≤0.01) and increased PHA-induced IL-2 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production (P≤0.01). However, these effects were not solely attributable to CLA as similar results were observed with linoleic acid. CLA supplementation had no significant effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells IL-4 production, or on serum-soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (slCAM-1) or plasma prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or leukotreine B4 (LTB4) concentrations. Conclusions: This study shows that CLA supplementation had a minimal effect on the markers of human immune function. Furthermore, supplementation with CLA had no immunological benefit compared with linoleic acid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)742-750
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)
  • Cytokine
  • Immune function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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