The experiences of young men, their families, and their coaches following a soccer and vocational training intervention to prevent HIV and drug abuse in South Africa

Dallas Swendeman*, Jason Bantjes, Deborah Mindry, Jackie Stewart, Mark Tomlinson, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Melissa Medich

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Young men in South Africa are at high-risk for HIV, substance abuse, and gender-based violence. This article presents qualitative results from a pilot study testing soccer leagues and vocational training to engage young-adult township men to deliver preventive interventions, including rapid HIV and alcohol/drug testing, shifting attitudes toward gender-based violence, and promoting other prosocial behaviors. Three groups participated in focus groups and in-depth interviews on experiences with the program: (1) a subset of 15 participants, (2) 15 family members, and (3) five intervention coaches. Results suggest that participants first reduced substance use on tournament days and then gradually reduced to practice days and beyond. Families suggested that “keeping young men occupied” and encouragement of prosocial behaviors was critical to risk reduction and led to increased community respect for the men. Coaches noted that behavioral and attitudi-nal changes were incremental and slow. The use of incentives was problematic and more research is needed to understand how incentives can be used in interventions of this nature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-236
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume31
Issue number3
Early online date01 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was supported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse grant R34 DA030311; the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment (CHIPTS) NIMH grant P30 MH58107; the UCLA Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) grant 5P30AI028697; the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through UCLA CSTI Grant UL1TR000124; the William T. Grant Foundation; the Jacobs Foundation; and the National Research Foundation, South Africa. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH. No Conflicts of Interest are declared.

Funding Information:
Dallas Swendeman, PhD, MPH, and Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, PhD, are affiliated with the Global Center for Children and Families, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. Dallas Swendeman, PhD, MPH, is affiliated with the Center of Expertise on Women’s Health, Gender and Empowerment, University of California Global Health Institute. Jason Bantjes, PhD, Jackie Stewart, PhD, and Mark Tomlinson, PhD, are affiliated with the Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. Deborah Mindry, PhD, is affiliated with the Center for Social Medicine and Humanities, Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. Melissa Medich, PhD, MPH, is affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine, University of California Los Angeles. This project was supported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse grant R34 DA030311; the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment (CHIPTS) NIMH grant P30 MH58107; the UCLA Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) grant 5P30AI028697; the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through UCLA CSTI Grant UL1TR000124; the William T. Grant Foundation; the Jacobs Foundation; and the National Research Foundation, South Africa. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH. No Conflicts of Interest are declared. Address correspondence to Dallas Swendeman, 10920 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 350, Los Angeles, CA 90024. E-mail: dswendeman@mednet.ucla.edu

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Guilford Press.

Keywords

  • Engagement
  • HIV prevention
  • Soccer
  • South Africa
  • Substance use
  • Young men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The experiences of young men, their families, and their coaches following a soccer and vocational training intervention to prevent HIV and drug abuse in South Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this