The influence of wear paths produced by hip replacement patients during normal walking on wear rates

D. Bennett, L. Humphreys, S. O'Brien, C. Kelly, John Orr, D. Beverland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Variation in wear paths is known to greatly affect wear rates in vitro, with multidirectional paths producing much greater wear than unidirectional paths. This study investigated the relationship between multidirectional motion at the hip joint, as measured by aspect ratio, sliding distance, and wear rate for 164 hip replacements. Kinematic input from three-dimensional gait analysis was used to determine the wear paths. Activity cycles were determined for a subgroup of 100 patients using a pedometer study, and the relationship between annual sliding distance and wear rate was analyzed. Poor correlations were found between both aspect ratio and sliding distance and wear rate for the larger group and between annual sliding distance and wear rate for the subgroup. However, patients who experienced a wear rate <0.08 mm/year showed a strong positive correlation between the combination of sliding distance, activity levels, and aspect ratio and wear rate (adjusted r2?=?55.4%). This group may represent those patients who experience conditions that most closely match those that prevail in simulator and laboratory tests. Although the shape of wear paths, their sliding distance, and the number of articulation cycles at the hip joint affect wear rates in simulator studies, this relationship was not seen in this clinical study. Other factors such as lubrication, loading conditions and roughness of the femoral head may influence the wear rate.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1210-1217
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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