The Limits of Inclusion: Representation of Minority and Non-Dominant Communities in Consociational and Liberal Democracies: Representation of minority and non-dominant communities in consociational and liberal democracies

Timofey Agarin*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Consociationalism starts with the assumption that in divided societies there are multiple groups with reasonable claims which leads to the development of group sensitive mechanisms for political representation. While consociations are put in place to ensure the participation of groups whose past disenfranchisement from (equal) political representation resulted in violence, their disregard for individuals and identities of other, non-dominant groups is comparable to the impact of liberal democratic governments on minority groups. Both the approach observed in consociational practice and the liberal democratic approach of accommodating members of minority groups result from a preference for the political accommodation of majority group identities. Both approaches, I argue, result in the neglect of the input of minority and non-dominant groups. This effect is principally, a result of the lack of guaranteed representation afforded to their group identities and is exacerbated by the representation of majority interests which is aggregated from individual-level participation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Political Science Review
Early online date24 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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inclusion
minority
democracy
community
Group
participation
accommodation
neglect
violence
lack
society

Keywords

  • Consociationalism
  • liberal democracy
  • non-dominant communities
  • participation
  • representation

Cite this

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