The medical licensing assessment will fall short of determining whether a UK medical graduate behaves ethically

Zuzana Deans*, Greg Moorlock, Michael Trimble

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

UK medical graduates will soon need to pass the medical licensing assessment, which assesses skills and knowledge in ethics using multiple choice questions (eg single best answer questions) and objective structured clinical examination. However, educational leaders have recognised that these methods lack the sophistication needed to accurately assess medical ethics. The reasons are two-fold. First, there may be a knowledge and practice gap in medical schools when it comes to preparing students for the assessment. To this end, this article shares peer advice about how best to use objective structured clinical examinations and single best answer questions for assessing medical ethics to help prepare students for the medical licensing assessment. Second, the design of the assessment is unlikely to adequately measure graduates' ethical values and behaviour in real world scenarios. Further work is needed to design assessments that are sophisticated enough to examine candidates' ethical reasoning and their actual behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Hospital Medicine
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Humans
  • Ethics, Medical
  • Physical Examination
  • Problem Solving
  • Schools, Medical
  • United Kingdom

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