The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding

Angel L Pey, Esperanza Padín-Gonzalez, Noel Mesa-Torres, David J Timson

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Abstract

Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-114
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Volume562
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2014

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UDPglucose 4-Epimerase
Galactosemias
Racemases and Epimerases
Galactose
Substrates
Proteolysis
Ligands
Uridine Diphosphate Glucose
Denaturation
NAD
Mutation
Hot Temperature
Enzyme kinetics
Proteins
Dimers
galactose epimerase
Thermodynamic stability
Communication
Kinetics
Temperature

Cite this

@article{bfb26664f48141b8b95fe303d8308d17,
title = "The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding",
abstract = "Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.",
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The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding. / Pey, Angel L; Padín-Gonzalez, Esperanza; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Timson, David J.

In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 562, 15.11.2014, p. 103-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Pey, Angel L

AU - Padín-Gonzalez, Esperanza

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AU - Timson, David J

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N2 - Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.

AB - Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.

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