The music of recovery and desistance: Prison-based musical tuition as a strengths-based intervention

Joanna Cursley, Shadd Maruna

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The role of self-narrative in the process of desistance from crime has been widely acknowledged and accepted in recent research. In order to change entrenched patterns of criminal behaviour, it is argued, an individual needs to change the story of who he or she is and possibly rewrite their past to explain the present transformation. In this chapter, we develop this thesis further by suggesting the possible inclusion of music in this process of biographical reconstruction. Drawing on evidence from the prison-based charity Changing Tunes, we argue that songs provide a unique psychosocial mechanism for making emotional sense of complicated and difficult life experiences, and therefore can play a substantial role in the rehabilitative process.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStrengths-Based Approaches to Crime and Substance Use
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Drugs and Crime to Desistance and Recovery
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages257-275
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781351852494
ISBN (Print)9781138288737
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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    Cursley, J., & Maruna, S. (2019). The music of recovery and desistance: Prison-based musical tuition as a strengths-based intervention. In Strengths-Based Approaches to Crime and Substance Use: From Drugs and Crime to Desistance and Recovery (pp. 257-275). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315227221-14