The prevalence and recognition of major depression among low-level aged care residents with and without cognitive impairment

T E Davison, M P McCabe, D Mellor, C Ski, K George, K A Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated a high level of depression in nursing homes. The current study was designed to determine the prevalence of depression, using a structured diagnostic interview, among older people with and without mild-moderate cognitive impairment residing in low-level care facilities. The results demonstrated that, consistent with previous research in nursing homes, 16.9% of older people were diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Less than half of these cases had been detected or treated. Individuals with moderate cognitive impairment were more likely to be depressed, but cognitive impairment did not appear to act as a strong impediment to the detection of depression by general practitioners. A low awareness of their use of antidepressant medications was demonstrated among older people prescribed this treatment, including those with normal cognitive function. Reasons for the poor recognition of depression among older people are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-8
Number of pages7
JournalAging & Mental Health
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Cognition Disorders
  • Depression
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Male
  • Nursing Homes
  • Victoria
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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