The role played by a range of psychological variables in nurses’ handwashing behaviour

D. Hanna, M. Davies, Martin Dempster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Psychological models of behaviour change are used to predict patients’ health behaviours but have rarely been used to explore healthcare professionals’ health-related behaviour. Aim: To explore the association between self-reported handwashing and a range of psychological variables in a sample of nurses in a large acute hospital. Results and discussion: Nurses in this study were more likely to wash their hands if they perceived it to be important and if they thought their workplace helped them in doing so. The best predictor of perceived importance was how strongly a nurse believed that poor handwashing practice contributes to spreading infection. Conclusion: In this study, psychological variables such as perception of importance, perception of workplace support, occupational stress and perception of risk were important predictors of handwashing behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-19
Number of pages2
JournalNursing times
Volume105
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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