The use of water soluble mucoadhesive gels for the intravesical delivery of epirubicin to the bladder for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

Dani Chatta, Lewis Cottrell, Bruce Burnett, Garry Laverty, Christopher McConville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
595 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: To develop an epirubicin-loaded, water-soluble mucoadhesive gels that have the correct rheological properties to facilitate their delivery into the bladder via a catheter, while allowing for their spread across the bladder wall with limited expansion of the bladder and increasing the retention of epirubicin in the bladder and flushing with urine.

Methods: Epirubicin-loaded hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC) and hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) gels were manufactured and tested for their rheological properties. Their ability to be pushed through a catheter was also assessed as was their in-vitro drug release, spreading in a bladder and retention of epirubicin after flushing with simulated urine.

Key findings: Epirubicin drug release was viscosity-dependent. The 1 and 1.5% HEC gels and the 1, 1.5 and 2% HPMC gels had the correct viscosity to be administered through a model catheter and spread evenly across the bladder wall under the pressure of the detrusor muscle. The epirubicin-loaded gels had an increased retention time in the bladder when compared with a standard intravesical solution of epirubicin, even after successive flushes with simulated urine.

Conclusion: The increased retention of epirubicin in the bladder by the HEC and HPMC gels warrant further investigation, using an in-vivo model, to assess their potential for use as treatment for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1355-1362
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Volume67
Issue number10
Early online date16 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

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