The Views and Experiences of Fathers of Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the International Evidence

Lynne Marsh, Michael Brown, Edward Mccann*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

As a result of societal changes and expectations, mothers have returned to paid employment, with fathers now more involved in the daily lives of their children with and without disabilities. Globally, fathers are providing more care for their children with intellectual disabilities (ID), a role traditionally expected of mothers. The research interest in the role of fathers in the lives of their child with ID is growing, yet much of the wider evidence has focused on the views and experiences of mothers as care givers. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the views and experiences of fathers parenting children with ID. A total of 14 studies were included in the review. Four themes were identified including emotional impact, mental health and coping, systems of support and hopes and fears. There is a need for further research on the needs of fathers and how they can be supported to play a fuller role in the lives of their child with ID. Implications for policy, practice and future research are also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Early online date12 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 12 Jan 2020

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Disabled Children
Fathers
Intellectual Disability
father
disability
evidence
Mothers
experience
Hope
research interest
Parenting
Research
Caregivers
Fear
Mental Health
coping
mental health
anxiety

Cite this

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title = "The Views and Experiences of Fathers of Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the International Evidence",
abstract = "As a result of societal changes and expectations, mothers have returned to paid employment, with fathers now more involved in the daily lives of their children with and without disabilities. Globally, fathers are providing more care for their children with intellectual disabilities (ID), a role traditionally expected of mothers. The research interest in the role of fathers in the lives of their child with ID is growing, yet much of the wider evidence has focused on the views and experiences of mothers as care givers. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the views and experiences of fathers parenting children with ID. A total of 14 studies were included in the review. Four themes were identified including emotional impact, mental health and coping, systems of support and hopes and fears. There is a need for further research on the needs of fathers and how they can be supported to play a fuller role in the lives of their child with ID. Implications for policy, practice and future research are also discussed.",
author = "Lynne Marsh and Michael Brown and Edward Mccann",
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AU - Mccann, Edward

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AB - As a result of societal changes and expectations, mothers have returned to paid employment, with fathers now more involved in the daily lives of their children with and without disabilities. Globally, fathers are providing more care for their children with intellectual disabilities (ID), a role traditionally expected of mothers. The research interest in the role of fathers in the lives of their child with ID is growing, yet much of the wider evidence has focused on the views and experiences of mothers as care givers. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the views and experiences of fathers parenting children with ID. A total of 14 studies were included in the review. Four themes were identified including emotional impact, mental health and coping, systems of support and hopes and fears. There is a need for further research on the needs of fathers and how they can be supported to play a fuller role in the lives of their child with ID. Implications for policy, practice and future research are also discussed.

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