‘There is no Hindu community in Northern Ireland’: Diasporic Place-Making amongst Belfast’s Hindus - Research in Religion Conference, The University of Edinburgh

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper critically investigates the affective place-making practices of two Hindu groups, originating from the Punjab and Southern India. Punjabi’s moved to (Northern) Ireland from the early twentieth century onwards. A later wave of diaspora saw people from Southern India, mainly Andhra Pradesh, move and settle in Northern Ireland. I will argue that today, while there are diasporic groups of Hindus in Northern Ireland, they do not form a singular community.

The research considers how affective place-making is manifested through intra- and inter-group formation within the single location of the Indian Community Centre (ICC) in Belfast. It explores similarities and differences in affective place-making between the two groups, and investigates how affective arrangements serve to develop and maintain transnational identity. Thirdly, it examines the roles of the physical presence of deities play in the embodiment of affective place-making. My research demonstrates the extent to which geographical and cultural connections have influenced these practices, and explores the significance of history, migration, cultural and transnational connections.

The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in 2018, using various methods including informal conversations, semi-structured interviews, photography and participant observation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2018

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