Time and risk preferences and the perceived effectiveness of incentives to comply with diabetic retinopathy screening among older adults with type 2 diabetes

Jianjun Tang*, Ziwei Yang, Frank Kee, Nathan Congdon

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Behavioral economics has the potential to inform the design of incentives to improve disease screening programs by accounting for various behavioral biases. We investigate the association between multiple behavioral economics concepts and the perceived effectiveness of incentive strategies for behavioral change among older patients with a chronic disease. This association is examined by focusing on diabetic retinopathy screening, which is recommended but very variably followed by persons living with diabetes. Five time and risk preference concepts (i.e., utility curvature, probability weighting, loss aversion, discount rate, and present-bias) are estimated simultaneously in a structural econometric framework, based on a series of deliberately-designed economic experiments offering real money. We find that higher discount rates and loss aversion and lower probability weighting are significantly associated with lower perceived effectiveness of intervention strategies whereas present-bias and utility curvature have an insignificant association with it. Finally, we also observe strong urban vs. rural heterogeneity in the association between our behavioral economic concepts and the perceived effectiveness of intervention strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1101909
Number of pages13
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Psychology
  • economic experiments
  • screening compliance
  • behavioral economics
  • persons with diabetes
  • China

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