Traditions and transitions: teenagers’ perceptions of parading in Belfast

Madeleine Leonard*, Martina McKnight

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to explore and illuminate teenagers' experiences of, and attitudes to, parades in Belfast. The research draws on responses from 125 teenagers located in interface areas (areas where Catholics and Protestants live side by side but apart) to government supported attempts to rebrand Orangefest (traditional parade associated with Protestant/Unionist/Loyalist community) and St Patrick's Day (traditional parade associated with Catholic/Nationalist/Republican community) as all-inclusive community events. For the most part, young people access these parades in pre-existing, single identity peer groups and view these parades as either inclusive or exclusive calling into question the extent to which Belfast's city centre can be viewed as shared space.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)398-412
Number of pages15
JournalChildren's Geographies
Volume13
Issue number4
Early online date28 Oct 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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community
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peer group
city center
event
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city centre
young
experience

Keywords

  • Belfast
  • city centres
  • parades
  • shared space
  • teenagers

Cite this

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Traditions and transitions: teenagers’ perceptions of parading in Belfast. / Leonard, Madeleine; McKnight, Martina.

In: Children's Geographies, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2015, p. 398-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - McKnight, Martina

PY - 2015

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AB - The purpose of this article is to explore and illuminate teenagers' experiences of, and attitudes to, parades in Belfast. The research draws on responses from 125 teenagers located in interface areas (areas where Catholics and Protestants live side by side but apart) to government supported attempts to rebrand Orangefest (traditional parade associated with Protestant/Unionist/Loyalist community) and St Patrick's Day (traditional parade associated with Catholic/Nationalist/Republican community) as all-inclusive community events. For the most part, young people access these parades in pre-existing, single identity peer groups and view these parades as either inclusive or exclusive calling into question the extent to which Belfast's city centre can be viewed as shared space.

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KW - city centres

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