Trajectories of body mass index and waist circumference in relation to the risk of cardiac arrhythmia: a prospective cohort study

Liming Zhang, Shuohua Chen, Xingqi Cao, Jiening Yu, Zhenqing Yang, Zeinab Abdelrahman, Gan Yang, Liang Wang, Xuehong Zhang, Yimin Zhu, Shuoling Wu, Zuyun Liu

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Abstract

Background: The aim of the current study was to explore the trajectories, variabilities, and cumulative exposures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with cardiac arrhythmia (CA) risks. Methods: In total, 35,739 adults from the Kailuan study were included. BMI and WC were measured repeatedly during the 2006–2010 waves. CA was identified via electrocardiogram diagnosis. BMI and WC trajectories were fitted using a group-based trajectory model. The associations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: We identified four stable trajectories for BMI and WC, respectively. Neither the BMI trajectories nor the baseline BMI values were associated with the risk of CA. Compared to the low-stable WC group, participants in the high-stable WC group had a higher risk of CA (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.86). Interestingly, the cumulative exposures of BMI and WC instead of their variabilities were associated with the risk of CA. In the stratified analyses, the positive associations of the high-stable WC group with the risk of CA were found in females only (HR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.02, 3.83). Conclusions: A high-stable WC trajectory is associated with a higher risk of CA among Chinese female adults, underscoring the potential of WC rather than BMI to identify adults who are at risk.
Original languageEnglish
Article number704
Number of pages13
JournalNutrients
Volume16
Issue number5
Early online date29 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Mar 2024

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