Trauma typology as a risk factor for aggression and self-harm in a complex PTSD population: The mediating role of alterations in self-perception

K.F.W. Dyer, Martin Dorahy, Maria Shannon, Mary Corry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the role of prolonged, repeated traumatic experiences such as childhood and sectarian trauma in the development of posttraumatic aggression and self-harm. Forty-four adult participants attending therapy for complex trauma in Northern Ireland were obtained via convenience sampling. When social desirability was controlled, childhood emotional and physical neglect were significant correlates of posttraumatic hostility and history of self-harm. These relationships were mediated by alterations in self-perception (e.g., shame, guilt). Severity of sectarian-related experiences was not related to self-destructive behaviors. Moreover, none of the trauma factors were related to overt aggressive behavior. The findings have implications for understanding risk factors for posttraumatic aggression and self-harm, as well as their treatment. © 2013 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-68
JournalJournal of Trauma and Dissociation
Volume14
Issue number1
Early online date10 Aug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

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