‘Ulster Says No’: Regulating the consumption of commercial sex spaces and services in Northern Ireland

Paul J. Maginn, Graham Ellison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
2431 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Commercial forms of sex such as prostitution/sex work, strip clubs and even sex shops have been the subject of much political debate and policy regulation over the last decade or so in the UK and Ireland. These myriad forms of commercial sex and land usage have managed to survive and even thrive in the face of public outcry and regulation. Despite being part of the UK we suggest that Northern Ireland has steered its own regulatory course, whereby the consumption of commercial sexual spaces and services have been the subject of intense moral and legal oversight in ways that are not apparent in other UK regions. Nevertheless, in spite of this we also argue that the context of Northern Ireland may provide some lessons for the ways that religious values and moral reasoning can influence debates on commercial sex elsewhere.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)806-821
Number of pages15
JournalUrban Studies
Volume54
Issue number3
Early online date01 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • city, prostitution, sex work, regulation, sectarianism

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