Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Elevated L‐Carnitine Metabolism in Pig and Rat Colon Tissue Following Red Versus White Meat Intake

Caroline Rombouts, Lieven Van Meulebroek, Margot De Spiegeleer, Sophie Goethals, Thomas Van Hecke, Stefaan De Smet, Winnok H. De Vos, Lynn Vanhaecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Scope:
The consumption of red and processed meat, and not white meat, associates with the development of various Western diseases such as colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. This work aims at unraveling novel meat‐associated mechanisms that are involved in disease development.

Methods and Results:
A non‐hypothesis driven strategy of untargeted metabolomics is applied to assess colon tissue from rats (fed a high dose of beef vs. white meat) and from pigs (fed red/processed meat vs. white meat), receiving a realistic human background diet. An increased carnitine metabolism is observed, which is reflected by higher levels of acylcarnitines and 3‐dehydroxycarnitine (rats and pigs) and trimethylamine‐N‐oxide (rats). While 3‐dehydroxycarnitine is higher in HT29 cells, incubated with colonic beef digests, acylcarnitine levels are reduced. This suggests an altered response from colon cancer cell line towards meat‐induced oxidative stress. Moreover, metabolic differences between rat and pigs are observed in N‐glycolylneuraminic acid incorporation, prostaglandin, and fatty acid synthesis.

Conclusion:
This study demonstrates elevated (acyl)carnitine metabolism in colon tissue of animals that follow a red meat‐based diet, providing mechanistic insights that may aid in explaining the nutritional‐physiological correlation between red/processed meat and Western diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2000463
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research
Volume65
Issue number7
Early online date01 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

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