Using Graphs to Visualise and Detect Anomalies in Access Control System Transactions

Michael Davis

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

Physical Access Control Systems are commonly used to secure doors in buildings such as airports, hospitals, government buildings and offices. These systems are designed primarily to provide an authentication mechanism, but they also log each door access as a transaction in a database. Unsupervised learning techniques can be used to detect inconsistencies or anomalies in the mobility data, such as a cloned or forged Access Badge, or unusual behaviour by staff members. In this paper, we present an overview of our method of inferring directed graphs to represent a physical building network and the flows of mobility within it. We demonstrate how the graphs can be used for Visual Data Exploration, and outline how to apply algorithms based on Information Theory to the graph data in order to detect inconsistent or abnormal behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011
Event11th European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches to Reasoning with Uncertainty (ECSQARU 2011) - Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Duration: 29 Jun 201101 Jul 2011

Conference

Conference11th European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches to Reasoning with Uncertainty (ECSQARU 2011)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBelfast
Period29/06/201101/07/2011

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