Validation of urinary cortisol as an indicator of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in the bearded emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator subgrisescens)

J.M. McCallister, T.E. Smith, Robert Elwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of cortisol levels as a measure of stress is often complicated by the use of invasive techniques that may increase hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity during sample collection. The goal of this study was to collect samples noninvasively and validate an enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for the measurement of cortisol in urine to quantify HPA axis activity in the bearded emperor tamarin (Saguinus imperator subgrisescens). Urine samples were collected from trained subjects between 0700 and 0730 hr during a 1-month period, and were pooled for immunological validation. We validated the assay immunologically by demonstrating specificity, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. For biological validation of the assay, we showed that levels of urinary cortisol (in samples collected between 0700 and 1700 hr) varied significantly across the day. Cortisol concentration was lowest at 0700 hr, increased to a mid-morning peak (0900 hr), and declined across the remainder of the day in a typical mammalian circadian pattern. We thus demonstrate that urinary cortisol can be used to quantify HPA activity in S. i. subgrisescens. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Primatology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Validation of urinary cortisol as an indicator of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in the bearded emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator subgrisescens)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this