Visualising the Worst News: Cinematography Vs. Psychology – Learning From The Visual Portrayal of How People Are Told They Have Cancer

Deirdre O'Toole, Mary Kemple, Aisling O’Toole

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Described as the most feared of modern diseasesCancer has been associated with pain and suffering,long difficult treatments, and death; conversely it isalso associated with heroism, self-transformation andsurvivorship. The diagnosis of cancer signalled a deathsentence until relatively recently, however, within thelast thirty years cancer is less likely to be considered tobe a fatal diagnosis as more people following treatmentgo on to experience long-term disease free survivorship.The increased likelihood of cancer survivorship hasbeen accompanied in increasing media attention tothe topic. Within this work we will outline the maindevelopments and issues associated with a diagnosisof serious illness and dying in a general sense while weexamine discourses of cancer with specific referenceto small sections of two films used as exemplars: Witwhere the patient dies and 50/50 where he survives.Uniquely this paper reflects the collaborative work of acinematographer, a psychologist, a hospital doctor anda nurse and as such brings very different perspectivesto the examination of this issue
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAvanca: Cinema International Conference 2019: Proceedings
Pages28-36
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NameAvanca: Cinema International Conference
Volume7

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