Wearable inkjet-printed antenna performance for medical applications at 868/915 MHz

Gareth A. Conway, William G. Scanlon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

220 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The use of biosensors attached to the body for health monitoring is now readily accepted, and the merits of such systems and their potential impact on healthcare receive much attention. Wearable medical systems used in clinical applications to monitor vital signs must be comfortable to wear, yet have robust performance to ensure reliable communications links. Additionally, and vital to the success of these innovations, is that these solutions are disposable to avoid risk of patient infection and this means that they must be ultra-low cost. Antennas optimized for printing using conductive inks offer new exciting advances in making a truly disposable solution.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2014 USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting (Joint with AP-S Symposium)
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages276
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)978-1479937462
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014
Event2014 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting - Tenessee, Memphis, United States
Duration: 06 Jul 201411 Jul 2014

Conference

Conference2014 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityMemphis
Period06/07/201411/07/2014

Keywords

  • Antenna measurements
  • Biomedical monitoring
  • Dipole antennas
  • Ink
  • Medical services
  • Phantoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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