“Welcome to our neighbourhood”: Collective confidence in contact facilitates successful mixing in residential settings

Clifford Stevenson, Rhiannon Turner, Sebastiano Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Over the past decade, increasing attention has been paid to the antecedents of intergroup contact and, in particular, self-efficacy to engage in intergroup encounters. Contact self-efficacy has been shown to reduce intergroup anxiety and increase willingness to engage in future contact, and is influenced by the positive contact experiences of other group members. However, this work has neglected the collective nature of self-efficacy and, indeed, has typically counterposed the effects of contact and collective efficacy upon group behaviour. We highlight the potential role that collective efficacy can play in facilitating intergroup contact and propose a new concept to capture this phenomenon: collective confidence in contact (CCIC). Using data from two neighbourhood surveys in contrasting areas of Nottingham City, (UK), we show in our first survey (n = 124) that CCIC is predicted by group identity and that this, in turn, predicts intergroup contact and feelings. In a second survey (n = 232),we show that the effects of identity and support on CCIC are further mediated by a reduction in intergroup anxiety. We propose that the concept of CCIC returns the understanding of contact to the intergroup level, thereby allowing issues of group identity and the generalisation of contact effects to be investigated more directly.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGROUP PROCESSES & INTERGROUP RELATIONS
Early online date13 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 13 Oct 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '“Welcome to our neighbourhood”: Collective confidence in contact facilitates successful mixing in residential settings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this