‘We’re too busy for that kind of stuff: Progress towards local sustainable development in ireland

Geraint Ellis, Brian Motherway, William J.V. Neill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses an issue of the broader context for local sustainability, and describes the relevant policy context either side of the border and evaluates the degree of implementation in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. It considers the implications for cross-border sustainability strategies and how local sustainability could be related to the issue of citizenship. A dominant theme in debates over sustainability is an increased emphasis on action at a local level, summed up in the maxim ‘thinks globally and act locally’. Indeed it has been suggested that 60 per cent of agreements made at the 1992 Rio Summit and 40 per cent of the European Environmental Action Plans have to be implemented at the local level and contributed a ‘New Localism’ where ‘local’ is conceived in both physical and social terms. The development of an island ethic of sustainability is therefore a major project that faces significant ideological and constitutional barriers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRenewing Urban Communities
Subtitle of host publicationEnvironment, Citizenship and Sustainability in Ireland
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages159-178
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781351904285
ISBN (Print)9780754640837
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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    Ellis, G., Motherway, B., & Neill, W. J. V. (2017). ‘We’re too busy for that kind of stuff: Progress towards local sustainable development in ireland. In Renewing Urban Communities: Environment, Citizenship and Sustainability in Ireland (pp. 159-178). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315244518-11