What accounts for the association between grip strength and mental functioning in aging people?

Richard G. Carson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Both in longitudinal studies, and when cross-sectional cohorts of older adults are investigated, there is a clear relationship between maximum grip strength and mental functioning. When monitored throughout the lifespan, the more rapid the decrease in grip strength over time, the larger the associated decline in cognitive capacity. In people of a similar age, those who have greater grip strength tend to exhibit higher levels of cognitive function. In short, “People who grip better, think better” [1].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-81
Number of pages2
JournalMaturitas
Volume138
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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