What do people think about running barefoot/with minimalist footwear? A thematic analysis

Peter D. Walton, David P. French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives

Barefoot running describes when individuals run without footwear. Minimalist running utilizes shoes aimed to mimic being barefoot. Although these forms of running have become increasingly popular, we still know little about how recreational runners perceive them.
Design

In-depth interviews with eight recreational runners were used to gather information about their running experiences with a focus on barefoot and minimalist running.
Methods

Interviews were analysed using a latent level thematic analysis to identify and interpret themes within the data.
Results

Although participants considered barefoot running to be ‘natural’, they also considered it to be extreme. Minimalist running did not produce such aversive reactions. ‘Support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, but lacked a common or clear definition. A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.
Conclusion

People often have inconsistent ideas about barefoot and minimalist running, which are often formed by potentially biased sources, which may lead people to make poor decisions about barefoot and minimalist running. It is important to provide high-quality information to enable better decisions to be made about barefoot and minimalist running.

Statement of contribution

What is already known on this subject?
There is no known work on the psychology behind barefoot and minimalist running. We believe our study is the first qualitative study to have investigated views of this increasingly popular form of running.
What does this study add?
The results suggest that although barefoot running is considered ‘natural’, it is also considered ‘extreme’. Minimalist running, however, did not receive such aversive reactions.
‘Support’ was a common concern among runners. Although ‘support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, it lacked a common or clear definition.
A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-468
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
Volume21
Issue number2
Early online date12 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

Fingerprint

Gait
Human Body
Shoes
Health
health professionals
Interviews
Psychology
psychology
interview
experience

Keywords

  • Barefoot Running
  • Minimalist Running
  • Psychology
  • Thematic analysis
  • Qualitative Health Research
  • Qualitative Research
  • Health Psychology
  • Sport Psychology
  • Sport Medicine
  • Running

Cite this

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title = "What do people think about running barefoot/with minimalist footwear? A thematic analysis",
abstract = "ObjectivesBarefoot running describes when individuals run without footwear. Minimalist running utilizes shoes aimed to mimic being barefoot. Although these forms of running have become increasingly popular, we still know little about how recreational runners perceive them.DesignIn-depth interviews with eight recreational runners were used to gather information about their running experiences with a focus on barefoot and minimalist running.MethodsInterviews were analysed using a latent level thematic analysis to identify and interpret themes within the data.ResultsAlthough participants considered barefoot running to be ‘natural’, they also considered it to be extreme. Minimalist running did not produce such aversive reactions. ‘Support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, but lacked a common or clear definition. A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.ConclusionPeople often have inconsistent ideas about barefoot and minimalist running, which are often formed by potentially biased sources, which may lead people to make poor decisions about barefoot and minimalist running. It is important to provide high-quality information to enable better decisions to be made about barefoot and minimalist running.Statement of contributionWhat is already known on this subject?There is no known work on the psychology behind barefoot and minimalist running. We believe our study is the first qualitative study to have investigated views of this increasingly popular form of running.What does this study add?The results suggest that although barefoot running is considered ‘natural’, it is also considered ‘extreme’. Minimalist running, however, did not receive such aversive reactions.‘Support’ was a common concern among runners. Although ‘support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, it lacked a common or clear definition.A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.",
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What do people think about running barefoot/with minimalist footwear? A thematic analysis. / Walton, Peter D.; French, David P.

In: British Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 05.2016, p. 451-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - French, David P.

PY - 2016/5

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AB - ObjectivesBarefoot running describes when individuals run without footwear. Minimalist running utilizes shoes aimed to mimic being barefoot. Although these forms of running have become increasingly popular, we still know little about how recreational runners perceive them.DesignIn-depth interviews with eight recreational runners were used to gather information about their running experiences with a focus on barefoot and minimalist running.MethodsInterviews were analysed using a latent level thematic analysis to identify and interpret themes within the data.ResultsAlthough participants considered barefoot running to be ‘natural’, they also considered it to be extreme. Minimalist running did not produce such aversive reactions. ‘Support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, but lacked a common or clear definition. A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.ConclusionPeople often have inconsistent ideas about barefoot and minimalist running, which are often formed by potentially biased sources, which may lead people to make poor decisions about barefoot and minimalist running. It is important to provide high-quality information to enable better decisions to be made about barefoot and minimalist running.Statement of contributionWhat is already known on this subject?There is no known work on the psychology behind barefoot and minimalist running. We believe our study is the first qualitative study to have investigated views of this increasingly popular form of running.What does this study add?The results suggest that although barefoot running is considered ‘natural’, it is also considered ‘extreme’. Minimalist running, however, did not receive such aversive reactions.‘Support’ was a common concern among runners. Although ‘support’ reassured against concerns and was seen as central in protecting vulnerable body parts and reducing impact forces, it lacked a common or clear definition.A preference for practical over academic knowledge was found. Anecdotal information was generally trusted, as were running stores with gait assessment, but not health professionals.

KW - Barefoot Running

KW - Minimalist Running

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KW - Thematic analysis

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KW - Health Psychology

KW - Sport Psychology

KW - Sport Medicine

KW - Running

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JF - British Journal of Health Psychology

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