'When I Land in Islamabad I Feel Home and When I Land in Heathrow I Feel Home': Gendered Belonging and Diasporic Identities of South Asian British Citizens in London, in Leicester and in North England

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    According to Deleuze and Guattari (1987) ‘de-territorialization’ is followed by a moment of re-territorialization. This moment, however, has to be regarded as a continuing educational process that becomes a different spatial site of social practices. It is argued in this chapter that regional, local as well as global identification override national and mono-ethno cultural identities, while shaping particular notions of gendered belonging and creating specific diasporic practices. Based on a sample of interviews with professional and academic South Asian British citizens in London, in Leicester, and in a number of Northern English cities gendered and generational patterns in terms of local diasporic identities are explored. Apart from multiple cultural belonging, foremost, territorial bonds and notions of group loyalty collapse at a point where temporary migration and settlement alternate in individual biographies.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMigration, Diaspora and Identity: Cross-National Experiences
    EditorsGeorgina Tsolidis
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages51-74
    Number of pages24
    Volume6
    ISBN (Electronic)9789400772113
    ISBN (Print)9789400772106
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Publication series

    NameInternational Perspectives on Migration
    PublisherSpringer
    Volume6
    ISSN (Print)2214-9805

    Keywords

    • Diaspora
    • North England
    • South Asian British Citizens

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