White and Latino Remarriage Differences in the United States: A Case for Moving Beyond the Catholic Assumption: A case for moving beyond the catholic assumption

Catherine B. McNamee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the United States, Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites have similar first marriage and divorce rates, but Latinos remarry at lower rates than Whites. Although Latinos are disproportionately more Catholic than Whites, and Latinos remarry less than Whites, assuming that religion is driving the remarriage difference could be a religious congruence fallacy, which occurs when religion is assumed to be the driving influence behind a behavior actually shaped by other forces. The present study utilizes the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and discrete-time event history analysis to examine the influence of religious affiliation and attendance on ethnic remarriage differences. The findings suggest that Catholicism does not account for the lower rates of remarriage of Latinos compared to Whites and provide strong evidence for dispelling the previously untested but frequently assumed Catholic influence on ethnic differences in remarriage. Additionally, Evangelical Protestants, particularly men, appear the most likely to remarry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-250
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Comparative Family Studies
VolumeXLIX
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

Fingerprint

remarriage
Marriage
Hispanic Americans
Religion
Catholicism
denomination
divorce
Divorce
Life Change Events
marriage
Longitudinal Studies
event
evidence

Cite this

@article{a61b1747da534ac0b613114dc7420ca7,
title = "White and Latino Remarriage Differences in the United States: A Case for Moving Beyond the Catholic Assumption: A case for moving beyond the catholic assumption",
abstract = "In the United States, Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites have similar first marriage and divorce rates, but Latinos remarry at lower rates than Whites. Although Latinos are disproportionately more Catholic than Whites, and Latinos remarry less than Whites, assuming that religion is driving the remarriage difference could be a religious congruence fallacy, which occurs when religion is assumed to be the driving influence behind a behavior actually shaped by other forces. The present study utilizes the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and discrete-time event history analysis to examine the influence of religious affiliation and attendance on ethnic remarriage differences. The findings suggest that Catholicism does not account for the lower rates of remarriage of Latinos compared to Whites and provide strong evidence for dispelling the previously untested but frequently assumed Catholic influence on ethnic differences in remarriage. Additionally, Evangelical Protestants, particularly men, appear the most likely to remarry.",
author = "McNamee, {Catherine B.}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
doi = "10.3138/jcfs.49.2.231",
language = "English",
volume = "XLIX",
pages = "231--250",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Family Studies",
issn = "0047-2328",
publisher = "University of Calgary Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - White and Latino Remarriage Differences in the United States: A Case for Moving Beyond the Catholic Assumption

T2 - A case for moving beyond the catholic assumption

AU - McNamee, Catherine B.

PY - 2018/8

Y1 - 2018/8

N2 - In the United States, Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites have similar first marriage and divorce rates, but Latinos remarry at lower rates than Whites. Although Latinos are disproportionately more Catholic than Whites, and Latinos remarry less than Whites, assuming that religion is driving the remarriage difference could be a religious congruence fallacy, which occurs when religion is assumed to be the driving influence behind a behavior actually shaped by other forces. The present study utilizes the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and discrete-time event history analysis to examine the influence of religious affiliation and attendance on ethnic remarriage differences. The findings suggest that Catholicism does not account for the lower rates of remarriage of Latinos compared to Whites and provide strong evidence for dispelling the previously untested but frequently assumed Catholic influence on ethnic differences in remarriage. Additionally, Evangelical Protestants, particularly men, appear the most likely to remarry.

AB - In the United States, Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites have similar first marriage and divorce rates, but Latinos remarry at lower rates than Whites. Although Latinos are disproportionately more Catholic than Whites, and Latinos remarry less than Whites, assuming that religion is driving the remarriage difference could be a religious congruence fallacy, which occurs when religion is assumed to be the driving influence behind a behavior actually shaped by other forces. The present study utilizes the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and discrete-time event history analysis to examine the influence of religious affiliation and attendance on ethnic remarriage differences. The findings suggest that Catholicism does not account for the lower rates of remarriage of Latinos compared to Whites and provide strong evidence for dispelling the previously untested but frequently assumed Catholic influence on ethnic differences in remarriage. Additionally, Evangelical Protestants, particularly men, appear the most likely to remarry.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077546098&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3138/jcfs.49.2.231

DO - 10.3138/jcfs.49.2.231

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85077546098

VL - XLIX

SP - 231

EP - 250

JO - Journal of Comparative Family Studies

JF - Journal of Comparative Family Studies

SN - 0047-2328

IS - 2

ER -