Words Matter: towards a new lexicon for 'nontechnical skills' training

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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Abstract

In this editorial, we contend that terms such as ‘nontechnical’ and ‘nonverbal’ are inaccurate and that they must be changed as part of the move towards a new lexicon for health professions education (HPE). Firstly, we examine how the use of the word ‘technical’ has evolved and how the technologization of HPE has resulted in problematic terminology that should be modified. Secondly, we look at the similarities between simulation-based education (SBE) and actor training and suggest that ‘behavioural’ is a more accurate term than ‘nontechnical’ when describing the range and complexity of interpersonal skills. Thirdly, we make the case for a revised HPE curriculum where ‘behavioural’ skills can gradually be brought up to par with clinical skills. We conclude by suggesting that a change in language will lead to a shift in attitudes and ultimately a change in educational focus regarding key skills that are often undervalued in HPE.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages4
JournalAdvances in Simulation
Volume4
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2019

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profession
health
education
education curriculum
technical language
simulation
language

Keywords

  • Nontechnical skills
  • Behavioural skills
  • Simulation-based education
  • Health professions education
  • Actor Training
  • Stanislavski system

Cite this

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title = "Words Matter: towards a new lexicon for 'nontechnical skills' training",
abstract = "In this editorial, we contend that terms such as ‘nontechnical’ and ‘nonverbal’ are inaccurate and that they must be changed as part of the move towards a new lexicon for health professions education (HPE). Firstly, we examine how the use of the word ‘technical’ has evolved and how the technologization of HPE has resulted in problematic terminology that should be modified. Secondly, we look at the similarities between simulation-based education (SBE) and actor training and suggest that ‘behavioural’ is a more accurate term than ‘nontechnical’ when describing the range and complexity of interpersonal skills. Thirdly, we make the case for a revised HPE curriculum where ‘behavioural’ skills can gradually be brought up to par with clinical skills. We conclude by suggesting that a change in language will lead to a shift in attitudes and ultimately a change in educational focus regarding key skills that are often undervalued in HPE.",
keywords = "Nontechnical skills, Behavioural skills, Simulation-based education, Health professions education, Actor Training, Stanislavski system",
author = "Paul Murphy and Gerard Gormley and Debra Nestel",
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}

Words Matter: towards a new lexicon for 'nontechnical skills' training. / Murphy, Paul; Gormley, Gerard; Nestel, Debra.

In: Advances in Simulation, Vol. 4, No. 8, 27.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

TY - JOUR

T1 - Words Matter: towards a new lexicon for 'nontechnical skills' training

AU - Murphy, Paul

AU - Gormley, Gerard

AU - Nestel, Debra

PY - 2019/4/27

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N2 - In this editorial, we contend that terms such as ‘nontechnical’ and ‘nonverbal’ are inaccurate and that they must be changed as part of the move towards a new lexicon for health professions education (HPE). Firstly, we examine how the use of the word ‘technical’ has evolved and how the technologization of HPE has resulted in problematic terminology that should be modified. Secondly, we look at the similarities between simulation-based education (SBE) and actor training and suggest that ‘behavioural’ is a more accurate term than ‘nontechnical’ when describing the range and complexity of interpersonal skills. Thirdly, we make the case for a revised HPE curriculum where ‘behavioural’ skills can gradually be brought up to par with clinical skills. We conclude by suggesting that a change in language will lead to a shift in attitudes and ultimately a change in educational focus regarding key skills that are often undervalued in HPE.

AB - In this editorial, we contend that terms such as ‘nontechnical’ and ‘nonverbal’ are inaccurate and that they must be changed as part of the move towards a new lexicon for health professions education (HPE). Firstly, we examine how the use of the word ‘technical’ has evolved and how the technologization of HPE has resulted in problematic terminology that should be modified. Secondly, we look at the similarities between simulation-based education (SBE) and actor training and suggest that ‘behavioural’ is a more accurate term than ‘nontechnical’ when describing the range and complexity of interpersonal skills. Thirdly, we make the case for a revised HPE curriculum where ‘behavioural’ skills can gradually be brought up to par with clinical skills. We conclude by suggesting that a change in language will lead to a shift in attitudes and ultimately a change in educational focus regarding key skills that are often undervalued in HPE.

KW - Nontechnical skills

KW - Behavioural skills

KW - Simulation-based education

KW - Health professions education

KW - Actor Training

KW - Stanislavski system

U2 - 10.1186/s41077-019-0098-5

DO - 10.1186/s41077-019-0098-5

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JO - Advances in Simulation

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SN - 2059-0628

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